Sociology Colloquia Series

The overarching goal of the Sociology Colloquia Series is to build intellectual engagement and community in our department for faculty and graduate students alike. 

For the 2018-2019 academic year, the colloquia committee will focus on the following three types of events: those in which we share our own research; those in which we invite outside speakers whose work is related to the research interests of the department; and brown-bag professionalization workshops for graduate students.

Suggestions for hosted events can be submitted using this online form.


    Spring Quarter

  • Faculty Dialogues: Immigration

    Thursday, April 18, 2019

    Time: 11:40 - 1:15pm
    Location: Rachel Carson College 301

    With Sociology@UCSantaCruz Professors Camilla Hawthorne and Juan Pedroza

    Camilla Hawthorne is a critical human geographer and interdisciplinary social scientist broadly interested in the racial politics of migration and citizenship, inequality, social movements, and Black geographies. Camilla is Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Inequality in the Department of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz, a principal faculty member in UCSC's Critical Race and Ethnic Studies program, and an affiliate of the Science & Justice Research Center. Her teaching is focused on race, immigration and citizenship, political economy, space and inequality, and social theory. Her work sits at the intersection of critical public policy studies, diaspora theory, Black European studies, and postcolonial/feminist science and technology studies. Camilla's current research explores the politics of race and citizenship in Italy.

    Juan Pedroza is an Assistant Professor of Demography, Migration, and Inequality in the Department of Sociology at UC Santa Cruz where he studies the changing landscape of immigration in the United States. Over the past decade, Juan has examined the vast inequalities of immigrants' access to justice, the social safety net, and poverty. His research examines how and where deportation and enforcement initiatives exacerbate these inequalities and leave imprints in our local communities. Juan is particularly interested in the role local contexts play in creating and cementing divergent outcomes in immigrant communities whose expertise spans immigration, social inequalities, and public policy. Juan employs social demographic, statistical, and geographic information systems methods and tools to analyze administrative, Census, survey, and qualitative data to answer research questions about our social world.

  • Graduate Student Professionalization Workshop: Preparing for the Job Market

    Thursday, April 25, 2019

    Time: 11:40 - 1:15pm
    Location: Rachel Carson College 301 

    Workshop presenters and details coming soon.

  • Stephanie Malia Hom on "The Island in the Middle Sea: Lampedusa, Migration, and the Ripple Effects of Empire"

    Thursday, May 16, 2019

    Time: 11:40 - 1:15pm
    Location: Rachel Carson College 301

    Hom's talk will explore the lasting connections between Italy’s current crisis of migration and detention and the carceral archipelago of its recent past. It interrogates the layered histories of the island of Lampedusa, and in particular, how the movements occasioned by Italy’s nation-making and colonial projects in the early twentieth century have textured migration and detention in the twenty-first. It traces the ways in which the control of mobility, vis-à-vis a discourse of temporary permanence, has informed the creation of these exclusionary spaces, and how Italy’s neglected colonial history in Libya (1911–43) has become cited and expanded in the politics of the present, transforming Lampedusa into the southern border of “Fortress Europe.” What is at stake is a sustained critique of empire and mobility, with Italy as the keystone for imperialism, past and present, in the Mediterranean.

    Stephanie Malia Hom is Executive Director of the Acus Foundation in Berkeley, CA. Hom writes and lectures on modern Italy and the Mediterranean, Italian literature and culture, colonialism and imperialism, migration and detention, and tourism studies. She is the author of Empire's Mobius Strip: Italy's Crisis of Migration and Detention (Cornell, 2019) and The Beautiful Country: Tourism and the Impossible State of Destination Italy (Toronto, 2015). She also co-edited with Ruth Ben-Ghiat Italian Mobilities (Routledge, 2015). Her essays and articles have been published in wide range of venues, including the leading journals in the fields of Italian studies, tourism history, urban studies, and folklore.