Faculty Publications


    Julie Bettie

  • Women without Class: Girls, Race, and Identity, With a New Introduction (2014)

    Book cover of Women without Class: Girls, Race, and Identity

    Winner of the 2004 Sex and Gender Distinguished Book Award!

    In this ethnographic examination of Mexican-American and white girls coming of age in California’s Central Valley, Julie Bettie turns class theory on its head, asking what cultural gestures are involved in the performance of class, and how class subjectivity is constructed in relationship to color, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. A new introduction contextualizes the book for the contemporary moment and situates it within current directions in cultural theory.

    Investigating the cultural politics of how inequalities are both reproduced and challenged, Bettie examines the discursive formations that provide a context for the complex identity performances of contemporary girls. The book’s title refers at once to young working-class women who have little cultural capital to enable class mobility; to the fact that analyses of class too often remain insufficiently transformed by feminist, ethnic, and queer studies; and to the failure of some feminist theory itself to theorize women as class subjects.

    Women without Class (2003) makes a case for analytical and political attention to class, but not at the expense of attention to other social formations.

  • Ben Crow

  • The Atlas of Global Inequalities (2011)

    Book cover of Atlas of Global Inequalities by Ben Crow and Suresh Lodha

    Drawing on research from around the world, this atlas gives shape and meaning to statistics, making it an indispensable resource for understanding global inequalities and an inspiration for social and political action. Inequality underlies many of the challenges facing the world today, and The Atlas of Global Inequalities considers the issue in all its dimensions. Organized in thematic parts, it maps not only the global distribution of income and wealth, but also inequalities in social and political rights and freedoms. It describes how inadequate health services, unsafe water, and barriers to education hinder people’s ability to live their lives to the full; assesses poor transport, energy, and digital communication infrastructures and their effect on economic development; and highlights the dangers of unclean and unhealthy indoor and outdoor environments. Through world, regional, and country maps, and innovative and intriguing graphics, the authors unravel the complexity of inequality, revealing differences between countries as well as illustrating inequalities within them.

    Topics include: the discrimination suffered by children with a disability; the impact of inefficient and dangerous household fuels on the daily lives and long-term health of those who rely on them; the unequal opportunities available to women; and the reasons for families’ descent into, and reemergence from, poverty.

  • Hiroshi Fukurai

  • Japan and Civil Jury Trials The Convergence of Force (2015)

    .As societies around the world increasingly face complex challenges, effective solutions are at a premium. In response, reformers have advanced varied forms of jury systems as means of fostering positive political, economic, and social change. Many countries have recently integrated lay participation into their justice systems to effect fundamental societal change, advance public policymaking, and manifest popular sovereignty. This book showcases Japan’s successes and challenges in recently adopting a quasi-jury system for serious criminal trials, and advocates that the convergence of various forces makes this an ideal time for Japan to expand lay participation into the civil realm.
  • East Asia’s Renewed Respect for the Rule of Law in the 21st Century: The Future of Legal and Judicial Landscapes in East Asia (2015)

    Book cover of East Asia’s Renewed Respect for the Rule of Law in the 21st Century edited by Setsuo Miyazawa, Weidong Ji, Hiroshi Fukurai, Kay-Wah Chan & Matthias VanhullebuschThis volume showcases the most recent research on the future of the legal and judicial landscape in East Asia and its renewed respect for the rule of law in the 21st century. The book features research on emerging judicial stratifications in the legal profession; war crimes and their legacies in the post-colonial era; citizens' participation in the justice system; gender, law, legal culture and profession as well as environmental justice.
  • Nuclear Tsunami: The Japanese Government and America's Role in the Fukushima Disaster by Richard Krooth; Morris Edelson and Hiroshi Fukurai (2015)

    Book cover of Nuclear Tsunami: The Japanese Government and America's Role in the Fukushima Disaster (2015)This book begins with the analysis of America’s post-war intelligence operations, propaganda campaigns, and strategic psychological warfare in Japan. Banking on nuclear safety myths, Japan promoted an aggressive policy of locating and building nuclear power plants in depopulated areas suffering from a significant decline of local industries and economies. The Fukushima nuclear disaster substantiated that U.S. propaganda programs left a long lasting legacy in Japan and beyond and created the fertile ground for the future nuclear disaster. The book reveals Japan's tripartite organization of the dominating state, media-monopoly, and nuclear-plant oligarchy advancing nuclear proliferation. It details America’s unprecedented pro-nuclear propaganda campaigns; Japan’s secret ambitions to develop its own nuclear bombs; U.S. dumping of reprocessed plutonium on Japan; and the joint U.S.-Nippon propaganda campaigns for “safe” nuclear-power and the current “safe-nuclear particles” myths. The study shows how the bankruptcy of the central state has led to increased burdens on the population in post-nuclear tsunami era, and the ensuing dangerous ionization of the population now reaching into the future. 
  • Race in the Jury Box: Affirmative Action in Jury Selection (2003)

    Book cover of Race in the Jury Box: Affirmative Action in Jury Selection by Hiroshi Fukurai and Richard KroothRace in the Jury Box focuses on the racially unrepresentative jury as one of the remaining barriers to racial equality and a recurring source of controversy in American life. Because members of minority groups remain underrepresented on juries, various communities have tried race-conscious jury selection, termed "affirmative jury selection." The authors argue that affirmative jury selection can insure fairness, verdict legitimization, and public confidence in the justice system. This book offers a critical analysis and systematic examination of possible applications of race-based jury selection, examining the public perception of these measures and their constitutionality. The authors make use of court cases, their own experiences as jury consultants, and jury research, as well as statistical surveys and analysis. The work concludes with the presentation of four strategies for affirmative jury selection.

  • Deborah Gould

  • Moving Politics: Emotion and ACT Up's Fight Against AIDS (2009)

    Book Cover of Moving Politics

    Winner of the 2010 Ruth Benedict Book Prize and Distinguished Contribution to Scholarship Best Book Award!

    In the late 1980s, after a decade spent engaged in more routine interest-group politics, thousands of lesbians and gay men responded to the AIDS crisis by defiantly and dramatically taking to the streets. But by the early 1990s, the organization they founded, ACT UP, was no more—even as the AIDS epidemic raged on. Weaving together interviews with activists, extensive research, and reflections on the author’s time as a member of the organization, Moving Politics is the first book to chronicle the rise and fall of ACT UP, highlighting a key factor in its trajectory: emotion.

    Surprisingly overlooked by many scholars of social movements, emotion, Gould argues, plays a fundamental role in political activism. From anger to hope, pride to shame, and solidarity to despair, feelings played a significant part in ACT UP’s provocative style of protest, which included raucous demonstrations, die-ins, and other kinds of street theater. Detailing the movement’s public triumphs and private setbacks, Moving Politics is the definitive account of ACT UP’s origin, development, and decline as well as a searching look at the role of emotion in contentious politics.


  • Herman Gray

  • Toward a Sociology of the Trace (2010)

    Book cover Toward a Sociology of the Trace by Herman Gray

    Questions national identity by investigating the creation of memory and meaning.

    Using culture as an entry point, the essays in this volume identify and challenge sites where the representational dimension of social life produces national identity through scripts of belonging, or traces. The contributors utilize empirically based studies of social policy, political economy, and social institutions to offer a new way of looking at the creation of meaning, representation, and memory.

  • Cultural Moves: African Americans and the Politics of Representation (2005)

    Cultural Moves: African Americans and the Politics of RepresentationHerman Gray takes a sweeping look at black popular culture over the past decade to explore culture's role in the push for black political power and social recognition. In a series of linked essays, he finds that black artists, scholars, musicians, and others have been instrumental in reconfiguring social and cultural life in the United States and he provocatively asks how black culture can now move beyond a preoccupation with inclusion and representation. 

    Gray considers how Wynton Marsalis and his creation of a jazz canon at Lincoln Center acted to establish cultural visibility and legitimacy for jazz. Other essays address such topics as the work of the controversial artist Kara Walker; the relentless struggles for representation on network television when those networks are no longer the primary site of black or any other identity; and how black musicians such as Steve Coleman and George Lewis are using new technology to shape and extend black musical traditions and cultural identities.
  • Watching Race Television and the Struggle for Blackness (1995)

    Book cover for Watching Race Television and the Struggle for Blackness by Herman Gray

    A classic examination of the cultural relationship between television and race—with a new introduction!

    In the late 1980s and early 1990s television representations of African Americans exploded on the small screen. Starting with the portrayal of blacks on series such as The Jack Benny Show and Amos ’n’ Andy and continuing through The Cosby Show and In Living Color, Herman Gray shows how the meaning of blackness on screen has changed through the years.

  • Producing Jazz: The Experience of an Independent Record Company (1988)

    Producing Jazz: The Experience of an Independent Record Company

    Small independent cultural organizations—record companies, book publishers, newspapers, radio stations—are among the most significant yet economically marginal producers of culture today. In Producing Jazz, Herman Gray explores the organization, ideologies, and social relations of an independent jazz recording company. His portrait of Theresa Records, a small but nationally known company in San Francisco, focuses on the ways in which an avocation grows into a business and highlights the conflicting goals of staying small and staying solvent. Gray describes the financial constraints, distribution system, aesthetic decisions, and organizational adjustments faced by Theresa.

    The independent status of a recording company is defined not by its economic and structural circumstances, but by the nature of its work, its records, the creative responses to its circumstances, and the commitment and ideology of its staff. The members of Theresa Records describe how staying small enables such a company to produce only the music it believes in and to avoid a hierarchical work structure. But smallness is a disadvantage when it comes to building a reputation, collecting receivables, and ensuring cash flow for the next production.

    Despite its low output and tenuous existence, companies like Theresa Records occupy an important niche in the music business by developing new talent, continuing to produce the work of seasoned musicians regardless of their popularity, and remaining stylistically adventurous. Producing Jazz suggests that from the creative and social spaces of such small producers comes much of the most vital, innovative, and progressive music, and therefore their significance far exceeds their size or profit margins.


  • Miriam Greenberg

  • Crisis Cities: Disaster and Redevelopment in New York and New Orleans (2014)

    Crisis Cities: Disaster and Redevelopment in New York and New Orleans by Miriam Greenberg

    Uncovers the political, economic, and cultural relationships between urbanization and crisis to provide a new perspective on how disasters and crises have influenced the development of cities.

  • Branding New York: How a City in Crisis was Sold to the World (2008)

    Book cover of Branding New York by Miriam Greenberg

    Winner of the 2009 Robert Park Book Award for best Community and Urban Sociology book!

    Branding New York traces the rise of New York City as a brand and the resultant transformation of urban politics and public life. Greenberg addresses the role of "image" in urban history, showing who produces brands and how, and demonstrates the enormous consequences of branding. She shows that the branding of New York was not simply a marketing tool; rather it was a political strategy meant to legitimatize market-based solutions over social objectives.


  • Rebecca London

  • From Data to Action (2013)

    Book cover for From Data to Action
    This book is a welcome guide for educators, civic leaders, and researchers looking for ways to leverage data to identify the most effective policies, interventions, and use of resources for their communities.
    In the current era of reform, much has been made of the fact that there are many influences that shape children beyond the walls of the schoolhouse. Powerful data “warehouses” have been built to track children and interventions within school bureaucracies and in other social service sectors. Yet these data systems are rarely linked to provide a holistic view of how individual children are faring both in and out of school and which interventions—or combinations thereof—are most promising. Privacy laws and institutional traditions have made such collaborations difficult, if not impossible. Until now.

    The Youth Data Archive, based at the John W. Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities at Stanford University, is an effort to blaze a new path to the productive use of cross-agency data now employed by researchers, school officials, and service providers in San Francisco, San Mateo, Alameda, and Santa Clara counties.

    Editors Milbrey McLaughlin and Rebecca A. London, leaders of the Youth Data Archive, bring together participants who describe the initiative and its challenges and successes. The participants also give detailed background on how the archive was built and how it has led to improvements in services, particularly for children at risk. This book is a welcome guide for educators, civic leaders, and researchers looking for ways to leverage data to identify the most effective policies, interventions, and use of resources for their communities.

  • Steve McKay

  • New Routes for Diaspora Studies (2012)

    New Routes for Diaspora Studies by Steve McKay

    Study of diasporas provides a useful frame for reimagining locations, movements, identities, and social formations. This volume explores diaspora as historical experience and as a category of analysis. Using case studies drawn from African and Asian diasporas and immigration in the U.S., the contributors interrogate ideas of displacement, return, and place of origin as they relate to diasporic identity. They also consider how practices of commensality become grounds for examining identity and difference and how narrative and aesthetic forms emerge through the context of diaspora.

    Study of diasporas provides a useful frame for reimagining locations, movements, identities, and social formations. This volume explores diaspora as historical experience and as a category of analysis. Using case studies drawn from African and Asian diasporas and immigration in the U.S., the contributors interrogate ideas of displacement, return, and place of origin as they relate to diasporic identity. They also consider how practices of commensality become grounds for examining identity and difference and how narrative and aesthetic forms emerge through the context of diaspora.

  • Satanic Mills or Silicon Islands? The Politics of High-Tech Production in the Philippines (2006)

    Satanic Mills or Silicon Islands? The Politics of High-Tech Production in the Philippines by Steve McKay

    Winner of the 2007 Sociology of Labor Book Award (Labor and Labor Movements Section, American Sociological Association)!

    Satanic Mills or Silicon Islands? challenges the myth of globalization's homogenizing power, arguing that the uniqueness of place is becoming more, not less important. Steven McKay documents how multinational firms secure worker control and consent by reaching beyond the high-tech factory and into local labor markets. He also traces the rise of a new breed of privatized export processing zones, revealing the state's—in these cases, the Philippines—revamped role in the wider politics of global production. Finally, McKay gives voice to the women workers themselves, as they find meaning, identity, and agency on and beyond the "new" shop floor.


    This book deftly weaves together three critical strands of global studies: Southeast Asia as a key site of global production, the organization of work in advanced electronics, and working-class conditions under globalization. Drawing on the author's rich analysis of four multinational electronics firms—from their boardrooms to boarding houses—Satanic Mills or Silicon Islands? makes a unique contribution to the study of work, labor, and high-tech production.


  • Jenny Reardon

  • Race to the Finish: Identity and Governance in an Age of Genomics (2004)

    Race to the Finish: Identity and Governance in an Age of GenomicsIn the summer of 1991, population geneticists and evolutionary biologists proposed to archive human genetic diversity by collecting the genomes of "isolated indigenous populations." Their initiative, which became known as the Human Genome Diversity Project, generated early enthusiasm from those who believed it would enable huge advances in our understanding of human evolution. However, vocal criticism soon emerged. Physical anthropologists accused Project organizers of reimporting racist categories into science. Indigenous-rights leaders saw a "Vampire Project" that sought the blood of indigenous people but not their well-being. More than a decade later, the effort is barely off the ground.

    How did an initiative whose leaders included some of biology's most respected, socially conscious scientists become so stigmatized? How did these model citizen-scientists come to be viewed as potential racists, even vampires?

    This book argues that the long abeyance of the Diversity Project points to larger, fundamental questions about how to understand knowledge, democracy, and racism in an age when expert claims about genomes increasingly shape the possibilities for being human. Jenny Reardon demonstrates that far from being innocent tools for fighting racism, scientific ideas and practices embed consequential social and political decisions about who can define race, racism, and democracy, and for what ends. She calls for the adoption of novel conceptual tools that do not oppose science and power, truth and racist ideologies, but rather draw into focus their mutual constitution.


  • Dana Takagi

  • The Retreat from Race: Asian-American Admissions and Racial Politics (1993)

    The Retreat from Race: Asian-American Admissions and Racial Politics

    Winner of the Association for Asian American Studies's 1993 National Book Award, Social Science!

    “An excellent book. Takagi takes a very complex and sensitive subject—racial politics—and shows, through a careful analysis . . . that changes in the discourse about Asian American admissions have facilitated a 'retreat from race' in the area of affirmative action. . . . This book will appeal to an audience significantly wider than a typical academic one.”— David Karen, Bryn Mawr College

    Charges by Asian Americans that the top universities in the United States used quotas to limit the enrollment of Asian-American students developed into one of the most controversial public controversies in higher education since the Bakke case. In Retreat from Race, Dana Takagi follows the debates over Asian-American admissions at Berkeley, UCLA, Brown, Stanford, Harvard, and Princeton. She explains important developments in the politics of race:  changes in ethnic coalitions, reconstruction of the debate over affirmative action, and the conservative challenge to the civil rights agenda of the 1960s. Takagi examines the history and significance of the Asian American admissions controversy on American race relations both inside and outside higher education.

    Takagi's central argument is that the Asian-American admissions controversy facilitated a subtle but important shift in affirmative action policy away from racial preferences toward class preferences. She calls this development a retreat from race. Takagi suggests that the retreat signals not only an actual policy shift but also the increasing reluctance on the part of intellectuals, politicans, and policy analysts to identify and address social problems as explicitly racial problems.

    Moving beyond the university setting, Takagi explores the political significance of the retreat from race by linking Asian-American admissions to other controversies in higher education and in American politics, including the debates over political correctness and multiculturalism. In her assessment, the retreat from race is likely to fail at its promise of easing racial tension and promoting racial equality.